Consciously forgetting the checklist in Italy

I know most people go to Italy with checklist ( I did on my first trip to Italy and I checked every single things off!). Here is probably the most popular-

  1. Roma – visting Christine Chapel, wandering Colosseum, people watching at Spanish Steps, testing Mouth of Truth (thank to the classic and graceful Audrey Hepburn), throwing a coin at Trevi fountains and making too many wishes, checking out Pantheons, walking Castello Angelo and putting a damn lock on the bridge).
  2. Venezia (Venice) – taking the overpriced romantic boat ride admiring and speculating stories about the Ponte dei Sospiri, visiting the basillica and bell tower, getting lost in the city (you don’t need to try, you will!), hopping on a river taxi to Murano and Burano, hoping to see wonderful yachts.
  3. Firenze (Florence) – seeing all legacy of the Medici family (Literally the entire city!), walking across Ponte Vecchio and admiring the local vendor, climb up the hill to see David and watch the sun setting over the city, etc. These plus day trip to Cinque terra, seeing Pisa leaning tower, tasting wine. Some people expressed to do Florence and Chianti in a day.
  4. Capri – I actually not sure about this one.

All the above are wonderful things and you need to know you are fortunate enough to see them, however, you can enjoy all that if you have at least a week in each city. And Italy is not just Rome – Venice – Florence. Also, mind you all these beautiful cities and sites are carefully preserved so that 10, 20, 50, 100 years from now, they still look great (and pretty much the same). For me, the entire city of Florence is a museum itself. So calm the h*** down!

Having been to Italy numerous times (I love it!), I’m speaking this from my own experience.

My first time in Italy back in 2009, I spent 10 days in the 3 cities above and crossed around 50% of the above. My 2nd time in 2013, I spent a week only in Chianti region (still didn’t do a vineyard visit!). The most recent, this summer, i spent 2 weeks. the first half lazing in Florence (My favourite city) and then a bit of running around south Ischia – Capri – Salerno. I didn’t cross many “must do”, but I collected some very fond memories and some good friends.

So here is 10 bullet buttons:

  • ARRIVAL – Try to arrive between 4pm and 7pm to ensure the best greetings at hotels or especially homestay/airbnb. Italians doesn’t really work in the morning, go on lunch break between 12-4pm and then off to fiesta at 7pm. It’s like God’s times to them so be respectful and don’t expect too much. People give you the most attention and most helpful from 4-7pm I found.
  • ATTENTIOn – If you want your host or the hotel to pick you up, call them the day before and as you arrive (even if you have told them through the booking, on messages, all black and white in writing). Italians love attention but they will leave you alone after check in. Love it!
  • BAR – If you are paying more than 1 euro for an espresso, you’re in a very touristy area. Try to look for though small local water holes which are cafe by day and bar by night. It’s the same word in Italians’ world – BAR. Go there in the morning and see those Italian order an espresso, talking to a stranger while waiting, drinking the coffee straight away, leaving a coin and off on his vespa. Those with mostly local are the best!
  • ROAM – Walk around, a lot, and try things out – whether its pizza, spaghetti, local beer, another Aperol spritz or some local made leather sandals. Some of these are at the bottom of Trip Advisor list because the shopkeeper don’t speak English or maybe only boring people leave reviews. Don’t bother to call taxi (and there is no Uber!).
  • LOST. Seriously get lost. Google Map doesn’t show little alleys in Italy so well and there are many walking/running trail that only the local knows. On a random turn during my morning run in Oltrano, I passed Galileo’s house and a small fort where you can have some very good sunset cocktails! I found the best restaurant i have ever been to in Ischia just by playing with my google map and roam around.
  • LOCALS – buy from them, I meant the street vendors who sell freshly picked fruits and vegetable, the local vineyard who only make a thousand bottles a years, the one at the corner with no sign.
  • WINE – Make time for wine tasting at a vineyard. Italian in the countryside exude this fountain of hospitality and share with you their most incredible wine and salami and olives and bruschettas.
  • TRAIN – don’t bother anything else – this is the one thing that is efficient in Italy. Go everywhere, on time, affordable.
  • MEDICI – Read about the Medici family. I was amazed at the rise and fall of this family and how far their power and money had stretched in the past.
  • EAT ALL YOU CAN. – amazing gelato, pizzas to die for, fresh pasta, so many condiments and cold cuts, cheese, sweet desserts ….

I have come to Italy to consciously see why Italians are being the way they are – fun, exuberant, talkative, gossipy, proud, trendy and very particular about coffee.

I hope you can start planning a fun trip.

Love,

Kate